SO YOU WANT A BLOODHOUND!
by Bill Ledford of BRIARPATCH BLOODHOUND KENNELS

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WHAT WILL YOU DO IF YOU GET A BLOODHOUND

puppy on chair Will you want:

  • A family pet
  • For Obedience with Titles in mind
  • For Conformation with Titles in mind
  • For Mantrailing with Titles in mind
  • For Law Enforcement work, Trailing and Rescue
  • For SAR (Search and Rescue) as a volunteer
  • For Breeding for Breed improvement
Are you prepared? Do you have a fenced yard? Do you understand the needs of a puppy and the growing to maturity of the dog? Do you understand how big a BLOODHOUND grows? Do you understand the BLOODHOUND is a very active dog? Do you understand the BLOODHOUND is a clown and not the most graceful animal in the world? Do you understand the medical needs of a BLOODHOUND? Are you ready for the slobbers, hair shedding, toe nail clipping? Have you read everything you can on the BLOODHOUND? Do you know what you want your BLOODHOUND for? Are you ready to give and in return receive tons of love and affection? If you buy a family pet are you willing to have it spayed or neutered as most reputable breeders will require it?

If you have checked all the web sites you will have a list of REPUTABLE BREEDERS to contact. Call more than one to find one you feel comfortable with.

Mantrailing With Jack Shuler
jack shuler Tell the breeder that you are a prospective new BLOODHOUND owner. Tell the breeder why you want a BLOODHOUND. Tell the breeder that you have studied and understand the requirements of BLOODHOUND ownership. Tell the breeder whether the dog will be a family pet or working (trailing) dog. If you think you would like to show a BLOODHOUND in the conformation ring, let them know. Maybe the obedience training and earning a title at the shows. All these options have many rewards and if you show you will meet so many other BLOODHOUND owners.

PLEASE - PLEASE Do not go to a pet shop , backyard breeder, or a puppy mill. They may cost a little less now, but the chances of getting a defective dog are much greater. By the time you discover the problem you will be so attached to the dog you won't want to return it and therefore have a possibility of high vet expenses. Take a look at a table showing some of the main differences in the types of breeders here.

Ask the breeder about Health guarantees. Are the sire and dam OFA certified? Will a pedigree be furnished? How will the puppy be shipped if it is some distance away? What is their breeding program? Is the bitch bred at every season (hopefully not)? Is there a history of bloat or torsion in the line? Listen to the breeder and understand what they are saying. Be comfortable with the breeder, after all you just may have started a long relationship and friendship. A reputable breeder has many years of experience and is a very good book of knowledge. After all this I suppose it would be well to ask a price. If you and they are happy, you will have a delightful furry bundle of joy for many years to come.

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